Event Date and Time
to
Location
Virtual - ZOOM Link to be provided after registration
Host
College of Information Studies

 

Organizations are facing a new challenge of integrating humans and robots into one cohesive workforce. Theories of diversity have been used to understand when humans trust and prefer to work with other humans in collaborative work settings. Although the diversity would be a useful lens to understand human-robot relationships, it is not clear whether the theory in human-human relationships is fully transferable to human-robot relationships because people may not fully anthropomorphize robots and dehumanize them. To address these issues, we proposed a research model and conducted an experiment with 347 participants to empirically examine the model. Our findings showed that surface-level and deep-level diversity can hamper trust in co-workers, and the negative effect manifests differently between a robot and a human co-worker. We also found that trust in a robot co-worker vs. a human coworker yield different effects for predicting preference for working with a robot co-worker over a human. Overall, our research contributes to the current understanding of human–robot teamwork by identifying the importance of diversity from the perspective of dehumanization and anthropomorphism of robots.

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College of Information Studies Dean's Speaker Series

Co-creating, sharing, managing, processing, and preserving information are critical for many day-to-day activities.

Whether it is educating children and youth, creating and distributing basic staples, or performing the foundational activities of civil society, the effective, efficient, and equitable handling of information is essential.

The iSchool Dean's Speaker Series features established and emerging intellectual leaders presenting cutting-edge research and thoughtful commentary on critical information issues that affect our lives and society.