Event Date and Time
to
Location
1101 Morrill Hall
Host
Maryland Population Research Center
Speaker
Conrad Hackett and Stephanie Kramer

About the Presentation

Around the world, differences in age structure, fertility, migration and religious switching are producing big changes in the religious landscape. For a decade, Pew Research Center has been studying how demography is reshaping the size of religious groups as well as differences by religion in demographic outcomes, including how educational attainment around the world varies by religion. This seminar will present our latest research on:

 

  • Which religious groups are growing fastest, and which major religious group is declining in number
  • How immigration is reshaping Europe’s religious profile
  • How religious commitment varies by age and gender
  • How religion is related to happiness, health and civic participation
  • & more!

Additionally, we will preview forthcoming work on differences around the world in household composition by religion.

About the Speakers

Conrad Hackett is Senior Demographer and Associate Director of Research at Pew Research Center. He is an author of many demographic studies including: The Future of World Religions: Population Growth Projections, 2010-2050; Religion and Education Around the World and The Gender Gap in Religion around the World. He has discussed global religion in media outlets including BBC, CNN, NPR, the Financial Times, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He tweets at @conradhackett.

Stephanie Kramer is a research associate at Pew Research Center specializing in global religion. Kramer is an author of Pew Research Center religious demography reports such as The Changing Global Religious Landscape and Europe’s Growing Muslim Population, as well as scholarly articles on religious demography and the psychology of religion published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Current Biology, the Journal of Religion and Demography, and elsewhere.

For more information, contact Jennifer Doiron at jdoiron1 [at] umd [dot] edu or 301-405-6403.