CCJS Professor Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

The Development and Life Course Criminology section of the American Society of Criminology honored Professor John Laub with its 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award. This award recognizes an individual who has a record of sustained and outstanding contributions to scholarly knowledge on developmental and life-course criminology, including criminal career research.

Dr. Laub was selected along with Professor Robert J. Sampson of Harvard University.

John H. Laub is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Dr. Laub’s areas of research include crime and the life course, crime and public policy, and the history of criminology.

He has published widely, including Crime in the Making: Pathways and Turning Points Through Life, co-authored with Professor Sampson. This book won three major awards: The Albert J. Reiss, Jr, Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association's Crime, Law, and Deviance Section; the Outstanding Book Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences; and the Michael J. Hindelang Book Award from the American Society of Criminology.

Also with Professor Sampson, he wroteShared Beginnings, Divergent Lives: Delinquent Boys to Age 70, which analyzes longitudinal data from a long-term follow-up study of juvenile offenders from a classic study by Sheldon and Eleanor Glueck. This book also won three major awards: The Albert J. Reiss, Jr, Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association's Crime, Law, and Deviance Section; the Outstanding Book Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences; and the Michael J. Hindelang Book Award from the American Society of Criminology.

From 2010 to 2013, Dr. Laub served as the Director of the National Institute of Justice in the Office of Justice Programs in the Department of Justice. The position of Director is a presidential appointment with confirmation by the United States Senate.

Dr. Laub, along with Professor Sampson, was awarded the Stockholm Prize in Criminology in 2011 for their research on how and why offenders stop offending.

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice congratulate Dr. Laub on this extraordinary honor.

John Laub